“Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.”
— Bertrand Russell, The Conquest of Happiness.

barretta:

My girlfriend Taylor and I made a blog. It’s, uh, sentimental and goofy and ridiculous, and full of me making googly eyes at pictures of her, and all the other things couples do. But that’s nothing I’m ashamed of. I love it.

Follow if you like. Let’s all be ridiculously in love together.

(via folliefollie)

My girlfriend Taylor and I made a blog. It’s, uh, sentimental and goofy and ridiculous, and full of me making googly eyes at pictures of her, and all the other things couples do. But that’s nothing I’m ashamed of. I love it.

Follow if you like. Let’s all be ridiculously in love together.

“Above all, do not lie to yourself. A man who lies to himself and listens to his own lie comes to a point where he does not discern any truth either in himself or anywhere around him, and thus falls into disrespect towards himself and others. Not respecting anyone, he ceases to love, and having no love, he gives himself up to the passions and coarse pleasures, in order to occupy and amuse himself, and in his vices reaches complete bestiality, and it all comes from lying continually to others and to himself.”
— Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov.

Salvador Dalí, Santiago el Grandé.

“The thirsty earth soaks up the rain,
And drinks and gapes for drink again;
The plants suck in the earth, and are
With constant drinking fresh and fair;
The sea itself (which one would think
Should have but little need of drink)
Drinks ten thousand rivers up,
So filled that they o’erflow the cup.
The busy Sun (and one would guess
By’s drunken fiery face no less)
Drinks up the sea, and when he’s done,
The Moon and Stars drink up the Sun:
They drink and dance by their own light,
They drink and revel all the night:
Nothing in Nature’s sober found,
But an eternal health goes round.
Fill up the bowl, then, fill it high,
Fill all the glasses there—for why
Should every creature drink but I?
Why, man of morals, tell me why?”
— Abraham Cowley, “Drinking.”

When in distress, every thing is a metaphor for the one thing that causes one distress. This is natural. Inhale. Life is a crafted thing and the tool for shaping that thing is the will. Exhale.

David Foster Wallace, The Pale King.

Salvador Dalí, Figure at a Window.

“Remember, being offended provides no objective indication of ‘right’ and ‘wrong’. It’s nothing more than a barometer of your own emotional control.”

Ricky Gervais (via thatlitsite)

erikadprice:

I’m sorry but

fucking barf

An offensive work is not bad because it hurt people’s feelings

A bad work is offensive because it is a fucking morally bereft travesty

Offensiveness is a symptom, an indication of the wrongness. It is not why the work is wrong. The content of the work itself (and its implications) is the problem.

And having an emotional response to a moral outrage is a sign of humanity and empathy. That should never be shamed.

Look, I hope never to be confused with a supporter or fan of, God forbid, Ricky Gervais. But this is the classic example of how defenders of “offendedness” (society’s high crime du jour) miss the point completely.

The operative word in the above quotation is “objective.” While being offensive is an indication of something’s rightness or wrongness to you, it is a subjective indication of such. You might be wrong about it being wrong. And here’s how.

Let us be reminded that:

  • … the same men who wrote “all men are created equal” would have been terrifically offended to hear that “men” could possibly be interpreted to include Africans or women.
  • … Saudi Arabia, for example, is by majority a country full of people who are offended to discover that denying women the vote and the right to choose their own clothing and lives is elsewhere considered morally reprehensible.
  • … it has been considered offensive to commingle the blood of Christian and Jew; miscegenate; desegregate; grant suffrage; feel sympathy for those led to genocide and slaughter; insult the king (lèse-majesté); be a homosexual, an apostate, a heretic, a schismatic, a nonconformist.

The examples could go on, but let’s drive the point home one last time: your offense proves nothing except that the subject in question does not accord with your morality. But your morality is not necessarily right or good or correct. You may, in fact, be a damn fool, and your emotional response may be inhumane and savage, the sort of horrific overreaction that inspired pogroms and Jim Crow. The only person who can completely trust their barometer, their indication of offensiveness, is a person whose morality is perfectly right and exactly correct.

There are people out there who really do believe that their moralities and their idea of what everyone should do and be is exactly correct. Tolerance is not their watchword, nor forbearance. They are remembered in the history books for a long time. But not kindly.

(via erikadprice)